Beef Kidney Paprika over Spinach

Contains:  Nightshades, offal, dairy.  Is:  Gluten-free, grain-free.

recipe, paprika, kidney, yogurt, spinach

My home version of chopped – without being time-limit-anal.

Okay, my version of “Chopped” without the insane and foolish run around before the 30 minute timer buzzes.

Paprika:

kidney, paprika, yogurt, spinach, recipe

The paprika choices in my kitchen. I elected to use both of them.

This was part of a recipe challenge on CookingBites.com.  I had to incorporate paprika into a dish of any sort.  I could use any type of paprika.

Beef Kidney:

recipe, paprika, kidney, yogurt, spinach

One beef kidney, 0.9 pounds. That central cortex must be removed.

It was thawed out, and I wasn’t going to be available to cook in a few days, plus I wasn’t always going to be dining at home every meal anyway – and I had other things in my fridge that also wanted the same consideration.

Yogurt:

yogurt, recipe, paprika

You want plain and unsweetened yogurt. I prefer whole milk yogurt – less likely to have sweeteners as excipients. (Tastes better, too.) For dairy avoidance: go use full-fat coconut yogurt.

Opened for a couple other dishes, and just for gnoshing on, I thought — why not use it with the other items, eh?

recipe, paprika, kidney, yogurt, spinach

Marinate the kidney with the paprika, a little salt, and a little pepper – in a yogurt sauce

Spinach:

Yup, another Use It Or Lose It.  Although I could have treated the chickens with it.  But hey, I needed to eat my greens!

Prep Time: 15 minutes. 
Marinating Time:  6-24 hours.
Cook Time:  45 minutes.
Rest Time: not essential.
Cuisine:  Hungarian/Offal.
Serves:  2.

Beef Kidney Paprika over Spinach

  • About 1 pound / 450 grams of beef kidney.
  • 3/4 cup / 180 mL whole milk yogurt, plain and unsweetened.  (Full-fat coconut yogurt option)
  • 2 teaspoons total paprika (I used 1 teaspoon smoked Spanish hot paprika + 1 teaspoon Hungarian paprika)
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground pepper (I used Trader Joe’s Rainbow Peppercorns)
  • a pinch of pink Himalayan salt or sea salt.
  • 2 small onions (about 5 ounces / 150 grams), peeled and coarsely chopped.  
  • 2-3 teaspoons of a healthy high-heat vegetable oil (I use avocado).
  • 280 ounces fresh spinach.

So, I cut up the kidney (1- 1.5 inch chunks optimal), removed the cortex (that hard white center), discarded that.  Made a mix with about 3/4 cup yogurt and a teaspoon each of my two types of paprika – one could also do two teaspoons of the milder Hungarian and leave out the spicy smoked – or if one has a mildly seasoned smoked paprika, that should work as well.  Add the pepper and salt.  Taste and adjust, keeping in mind that once the kidneys are added and they marinate, this will dilute some.

Marinate the kidneys in this, and refrigerate for 6 – 24 hours.

Occasionally, pull the dish out of the fridge, and stir.

When you are ready to cook, take the onions and sauté until lightly browned (and at least translucent) in a skillet to which you’ve added your oil and have brought to medium high heat.  Ten-fifteen minutes.

Add all the kidney and marinate mixture, and reduce heat, but keep the skillet contents simmering.  Stir often.  Cook about 25-30 minutes.

In a steamer, add water below, and add the spinach above.

Timing for the spinach will depend on whether you are using a gas, induction or regular electric range.  Bring the water in the spinach steamer to a boil, then time for about 5 minutes to wilt your leaves.  You want to time all this so that the spinach isn’t overcooked, but that the kidneys are done.  (One can always turn the kidney skillet down to a low heat while the spinach water comes to a boil and then the spinach steams.)

Serve the kidney mixture over the bed of spinach you lay out on a plate.

If you wish, dot with parsley for garnish.


This kidney came from a grass-fed, grass-finished cow (or steer) from Vermont.  

And we serve it with respect to Farm Fresh TuesdaysFiesta Friday, co-host Mollie @ Frugal Hausfrau), Full Plate Thursdays,


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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About goatsandgreens

The foodie me: Low/no gluten, low sugars, lots of ethnic variety of foods. Seafood, offal, veggies. Farmers' markets. Cooking from scratch, and largely local. The "future" me: I've now moved to my new home in rural western Massachusetts. I am raising chickens (for meat and for eggs) and planning for guinea fowl, Shetland sheep, and probably goats and/or alpaca. Possibly feeder pigs. Raising veggies and going solar.
This entry was posted in Cooking, Meats, Offal and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Beef Kidney Paprika over Spinach

  1. I have never made kidneys, although we always had liver when I was a child. I made it a few times as an adult, although it’s been a while – I think since I learned that there were higher concentrations of pesticides in the liver, and that was way back in the ’80s Now you can hardly even find it.

    Thanks for sharing at Fiesta Friday!

    Mollie

  2. Doesn’t kidney taste just like liver? I think I had it once before, and to me it tasted like liver.
    Btw, Diann, just a reminder that you’ll be cohosting tomorrow with Jhuls. Thanks!! ❤

    • Kidney resembles liver, but frankly, I think it tastes a lot better than liver (which is something I prefer to have in liverwurst or a pate).

      Yep, I am on the co-hosting! Thanks for the reminder.

  3. Miz Helen says:

    What a creative recipe to meet your challenge, it looks very interesting! Thanks so much for sharing your awesome post with us at Full Plate Thursday,447 this week. Hope you have a great Labor Day Weekend and come back to see us real soon!
    Miz Helen

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